INTERIORS

10 RENOVATION TRENDS YOU’LL BE SEEING A LOT OF IN 2022

See what projects the year will bring.

January 4, 2022

As life becomes weirder, and even more difficult to believe (a global pandemic, 10-minute jaunts to outer space, an endless string of biblical natural disasters), the message of 2022 is let’s live well and create our own happy places.  

We don’t want what’s readily available. We want our own style that reflects our personality,  that speaks to us, and boosts our confidence.

So, what will 2022 bring? It’s hard to say. But to get those dream homes and projects ideating, here are the home renovation predictions we are forecasting for the new year. Let’s keep renovating! Read more, ‘Exploring The Home of Tomorrow: Top 10 Design Trends.’

Aesthetically pleasing shade structures like pergolas not only provide comforting protection from the sun but also help make an outdoor space feel more connected and beautiful . Photo: Manolo Langis for Veranda Magazine.

Enhanced outdoor spaces and features

We’ve been bringing the indoors out for a while now, and one of the best ways to accomplish that from a functional perspective is to introduce shade structures like awnings or pergolas. We see more people making plans for this, as outdoor renovations continue to be a priority in 2022. Aesthetically pleasing shade structures like awnings not only provide comforting protection from the sun but also help make an outdoor space feel more connected and beautiful. Read more, ‘The Dream Home Has Changed.’

Outdoor spaces continue to be in the spotlight with people spending more time at home.

Outdoor showers work in all climates and have controls that allow complete control of water flow and temperature. Outdoor showers can be created in a variety of ways, and, typically, the all-in costs are under $1K for most designs. We’re loving the more sculptural and architectural styles that include features such as benches and stone flooring and walls.

In 2022, expect to see more and more photos of outdoor living rooms that look like indoor rooms. Houzz search data has shown that people want their backyards to be relaxing extensions of their interior living spaces. There have been major advances in outdoor materials in recent years, allowing manufacturers to create stylish and durable outdoor sofas, tables, rugs, chairs, and decor. Add an outdoor fireplace, maybe a TV, and the line between indoors and out seemingly disappears.

Outdoor renovations continue to be a priority in 2022. Photo: Lisa Romerein

Texture all around

Texture is one of the biggest trends for 2022. Say goodbye to flat finish drywall and hello to a surface you want to run your hands over or engage within a tactile way. Faux finishing has exploded onto the market recently with the advent of materials and processes that make tackling home projects and updates more approachable from a cost and skill perspective. Faux finishing is when you use applied materials to mimic installed materials. A popular use of this technique is creating a faux brick wall, and, if done well, you can barely spot the difference. Homeowners often opt for using a faux finish to achieve the look of Venetian plaster or to mimic concrete or marble.

We’re loving the array of textures found in wallpaper and new lines of paint.

We’re finding that clients have become bored with basic paint for wall applications and are now looking for dimension and visual interest. Grasscloth is a great option for more traditional and transitional spaces and brings a soft, subtle yet dimensional addition to a room. We’re also seeing new lines of 3D wall panels popping up, which designers are loving for modern and contemporary projects. Read more, How To Work From Home If You’ve Never Done It Before.’

Textured fabrics are here to stay. Cream bouclé was huge in 2021, and expect to see cream textured upholstery everywhere this year. Different colourways, such as sage greens, pale yellows, pale greys, and blues will be seen in 2022.

Texture adds a feeling of warmth to the home, and we tend to gravitate towards tactile and soft-to-the-hand fabrics. Interesting materials are taking a front seat.

People are excited about making a sophisticated statement that represents their style and personality. Raw metals and other panelling are increasingly frequent requests for projects, according to top designers. Natural wood textures with a patina tone are being used more and more on our top projects. With material options these days that can simply be placed on top of existing walls without expensive structural work, people can make a huge transformation without a monstrous investment.

Using textures in the built environment gives it soul. You want to touch and connect with it, adding a fifth dimension to the experience. The tactile nature of materials brings a richness to how a space affects. Read more, ‘We Can’t Go Back to Normal- How Coronavirus Will Change Home Design.’

People are excited about making a sophisticated statement that represents their style and personality like these artworks hung gallery style in the office kitchen of Sean Anderson’s Memphis Studio. Photo: Haris Kenjar for Architectural Digest.

Connecting with nature

Homeowners have been requesting more natural light in their homes through bigger window and door openings for years, and that’s a trend clearly continuing into 2022. People are increasing the natural light in their homes and creating a more direct connection with nature by adding doors where there were once windows, or adding larger windows for a greater sense of connection to outside. We’ve noticed homeowners embarking on remodeling work to replace more traditional patio doors with large scenic versions to create a connection between interior and exterior spaces for more seamless transitions and a sense of freedom. Read more, ‘Key Outdoor Trends To Make The Most of Your Garden All Year.’

Cool tones are gone and warm tones are here to stay—think greens, ochre, terracotta, oatmeal-beige, and greige.

We are moving beyond classic white and blue kitchens and gravitating toward colourways that remind us of nature. Because we have not been able to travel, inspiration will come from the colours of the desert – Arizona and the Sedona Mountains, the mustard tones of Yellowstone, or from Aspen when the trees turn. Look for beautiful, subdued jewel tones in nature-inspired colors, rather than bright, loud colours. Read more, ‘What Home Improvements Will Add Value To Your Home.’

Homeowners will continue to embark on remodelling work to replace more traditional patio doors with large scenic versions to create a connection between interior and exterior spaces for more seamless transitions and a sense of freedom. Photo: Lisa Romerein

Going bold

We’ll be seeing a lot more wallpaper because of the ease homeowners experience when having it installed or swapped out plus the freedom it offers to show off your personality. Current trends show homeowners using wallpaper with bold patterns in rooms where they want to experiment with colour and texture. A growing trend, especially think we’ll continue to see this in nurseries and children’s bedrooms. 2021 was a year where people expressed their individuality through unique colours, which can provide emotion and feeling to a room.

Last year brought awareness of individual mental health and wellness. With that being said, colour therapy is on the rise.

Popular colours we expect to see include pinks, burnt oranges, and peacock blues to represent a tropical getaway, as well as greens to mirror nature’s elements. There will be more unique colour contrasts in the kitchen, between the countertops and backsplash, or the cabinets and the island. With the rise and focus on creating a home we love to stay in, people will want to bring as much life to their indoor space as possible in 2022—colour is an amazing and affordable way to do so.

Now is the time for people to express their individuality through unique colours, which can provide emotion and feeling to a room. Photo: Sam Frost for Architectural Digest.

Dark is the new white. For the last several years, white has been a dominant force in colour choice for both new homes and exterior renovation. We are seeing a strong interest in dark neutrals and naturals. For example, natural wood paneling with a dark stain or changing from a light-coloured house to a bold, dark grey are becoming increasingly popular. We expect this trend to continue gaining traction for the foreseeable future. Sherwin-Williams Urbane Bronze, Benjamin Moore Black Knight, Sherwin-Williams Iron Ore and Benjamin Moore Iron Mountain are excellent darks with a timeless hue. Australians can get these colours colour-matched by Dulux. Read more, ‘Your Guide To Living Well In The Next Decade: 35 Insider Predictions.’

Investments in the home office

There will be an increase in home offices—homeowners are trading kitchen benchtops for more professional dedicated spaces. Zoom fatigue is real, but so is the realisation that the backdrop for those visual calls needs to step up. Allocating space for a home office often involves a reset of the room’s function. For example, sitting rooms off bedrooms or smaller family rooms can be converted. Guest rooms can also do double duty, with sleepers and desks.

We are all becoming more aware of how the layout and aesthetics of a room can affect our energy and productivity.

Transforming a current room into your new home office space is not just a fun project, but a necessity for many people who work remotely. When trying to boost the functionality of a home, this room may be at the forefront. People will spend more time and effort in designing a unique working space to maximise their concentration, motivation, and productivity this year.

Remember the days of home offices and dining rooms being the first rooms you see when entering a home? Well, those days are back. Once unused rooms such as secondary living spaces and breakfast rooms are now being transformed into custom office spaces with built-ins and high-tech solutions such as smart boards, projectors, and wet bars.

Remember the days of home offices and dining rooms being the first rooms you see when entering a home? Well, those days are back. Photo: Haris Kenjar for Architectural Digest.

Technology from start to finish

We expect the interior design industry in 2022 to make huge advancements in terms of technology. Digital interior design was already rising before COVID, and now that designers and homeowners have practiced social distancing, we see the efficiency of online interior design becoming even bigger in 2022. We also expect home decor apps, design firms, etcetera, to implement technological changes to their business plan for 2022, as the industry is ever-shifting towards newer technologies. V

Virtual staging can easily be done online, as well as furniture shopping with 3D models.

Even companies like DecorMatters are implementing artificial intelligence to automatically recommend products to individuals. During 2020, people began turning to their homes as the place for creativity and personalization and therefore capitalized on promoting comfort, character, and bright colours.

Durable surfaces

Homeowners are expecting greater performance from surfaces in their homes, especially as the majority of us are still spending a lot of time at home and cleaning our benchtops more often, meaning they need to stand up to extra scrubbing. As homeowners continue to get savvier about the maintenance required for many popular benchtop options, we’re seeing a rise in demand for acrylic solid surfaces that are seamless and offer durability with no additional maintenance, yet don’t compromise on sleek, beautiful design.

Texture is one of the biggest trends for 2022. Say goodbye to flat finish drywall and hello to a surface you want to run your hands over or engage within a tactile way. Photo: Sam Frost for Architectural Digest.

Creating side-hustle spaces

2022 will also see the rise of the “side-hustle bedroom.” With an entrepreneurial mindset, especially for Gen Z and Millennials making everything from candles to hats, the bedroom will take on flexible layers of activity, from filming set to creative studio, warehouse to shipment facility.

Whether creating or promoting products, or just shooting TikTok videos, bedroom aesthetics for younger generations become backdrops for personal branding.

Photography by Sam Frost for Architectural Digest

Being green, literally and figuratively

Greens will be a huge factor in home renovations in 2022. People want their homes to feel fresh but still comforting, and green is the perfect paint colour to create that feeling! Check out Sherwin-Williams Evergreen Fog SW 9130 to see the mood we’re heading for this year.

So many homeowners are inspired by historic and organic references right now, which backs up Yelp’s research showing that searches for reclaimed materials are up by 38%.

The majority of home projects in 2022 are centered around getting back to the root of materials. For example, stripping down lacquered cabinetry to expose the unfinished walnut underneath or replacing existing benchtops for a marble slab with raw edges—there’s something perfectly imperfect about reclaimed materials that help your space really begin to tell a story.

Plantlife has been working its way into homes in more creative ways, and we’re seeing innovations happen daily. Most recently, herb fridges have become a new kitchen appliance feature that is not only full of function but also stylish and urban with glass fronts showcasing the greenery bringing an organic touch to kitchen spaces. Read more, ‘These 21 Design Trends Have Stood The Test of Time.’

Photo: Sam Frost for Architectural Digest.

The pandemic created the realisation of health, the environment, and being less materialistic. People are reusing furniture, pursuing materials that support the environment, and promote recycling – pieces that hold meaning will be popular next year. Not to mention, natural materials like wood, rattan, clay, stone, etc. pair perfectly with any style, colour, or material. These textures add warmth and lightness to home decor and make us feel like we’re on holiday in our home since many of us are unable to travel.

Awareness of our environment and of Mother Nature makes us conscious of our carbon footprint and how we affect our planet. Using sustainable materials and lighting that consumes less energy brings less guilt in how we manage our planet and, thankfully, they look good too!

This article first appeared in Architectural Digest.

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